Attacks on emergency services

FurloughednFucked

Well-known member
I'm not sure if this is just in my area, but I've noticed increasingly that the emergency services are being reported as being attacked more and more.
Certainly before lockdown but there seems to have been two or three stories a week since lockdown was eased, and again when the pubs opened.
Obviously it's wrong, the police I can understand if not condone at all, being assaulted because of the nature of some of the jobs they attend. Criminals don't tend to want to be caught and are more likely to fight back I suppose.
My dad was a police officer 25 years plus ago and he got assaulted then too.
But firefighters and ambulance crews, and in one report recently, a coastguard unit locally too.
I just cannot understand the mindset behind attacking these workers at all. They're not going to arrest you, or throw you in jail, they're literally there to save lives, they're not a threat. But more and more they're being physically attacked going about their duties.
I can understand fear of hospitals, especially in MH patients, and certain illnesses of course make the patient aggressive or they don't know they need treatment. Those incidents though aren't the ones I'm talking about.
It's ambulances on call being wrecked, fire fighters having objects thrown at them, paramedics assaulted or threatened by people not involved with the casualty, bystanders. And worse still faking 999 calls for the purpose of assaulting them/damaging vehicles/causing trouble.
I find it utterly disgusting that people do that, that they have no regard not just for their life saving skills, and the person they're trying to save, but for another human being.
What do you think the motivation behind it is? Why would someone think "Let's call an ambulance so we can have a go at the paramedics or trash the ambulance"
Or see a fire engine on a call and start pelting the crew with anything they can lay their hands on.
Who's going to want to stay, or go into this essential work if this carries on and what is the answer?
Harsher penalties?
Naming and shaming?
Refusal of the service once they are abusive?
I really feel something needs to be done before we lose a lot of emergency services personnel because it's just too much.

Or maybe it's always been this bad but we hear more about it because of social media?
Interested to hear from any emergency services workers too on what their take on it is.
 

Captain Worfs

Well-known member
It’s because we’ve raised ungrateful, spoiled, entitled little shits who are now adults.

One glance at MN will show you that we are all raising little centres of the universe, with no values and moral compass passed down by generations.

Threads upon threads about hating or disrespecting in-laws, arguing about why their child should give up their seat on public transport, abusing teachers who try to educate and instill some discipline in their little brats...
 

Toooldtobearsed3

Well-known member
It’s because we’ve raised ungrateful, spoiled, entitled little shits who are now adults.

One glance at MN will show you that we are all raising little centres of the universe, with no values and moral compass passed down by generations.

Threads upon threads about hating or disrespecting in-laws, arguing about why their child should give up their seat on public transport, abusing teachers who try to educate and instill some discipline in their little brats...
Totally agree.
I am not advocating a return to my childhood, where smacking was the norm and could go too far in some instances. However, there was an element of fear always present, which prevented us from being too naughty.
If i was in trouble at school, I would be in trouble at home too - so tried to keep my nose clean ( not very sucessfully at times)!
The element of fear of the consequences has gone now. A lotbof parents could not give a toss, others would defend their offspring to the hilt, no matter what they had done.
It is always someone elses fault.
Or they have a syndrome (and I am not including genuine sufferers in that).

I have heard it around here. 'Oh, but they're bored, theres nothing around here for them' so the answer is to start a fire in the middle of the village green.

Bugger off. There was nothing for us either, so we sat on the wall outside the chippy and smoked a pack of woodbines before inhaling a bag of mint imperials to mask the stench 😁

It is the lack of the fear of consequences that enables them.

In my opinion 😉
 

Captain Worfs

Well-known member
Yep, children have no authority figures and role models and don’t learn respect. Parents are wet lettuces who try to be friends with their children, abandoning parenting.

The first authority figures in life are teachers - if parents disrespect them in front of their kids, they do them such a big disservice. Everything goes downhill from there.

Not all teachers are saints, but that’s even better - it’s a lesson that life isn’t always fair, people aren’t always easy to get along with, and sometimes you have to keep your mouth shut.

I think that’s the issue explored in the highly controversial 😆 book Why Borders Matter: Why Humanity Must Relearn the Art of Drawing Boundaries.
I must remember to order it, though I’m already in agreement with it. The review I read was essentially ‘we’re raising narcissists who think that they are always right and cannot deal with other opinions’.
 

LilyLangtry

Well-known member
It is the lack of the fear of consequences that enables them.
I think that’s it, in a nutshell. When you raise a generation to know their rights, without bothering to teach them that those rights carry equal and corresponding responsibilities, it’s a recipe for trouble. Unfortunately, it’s the rest of us who reap the results. The emergency services, because they are uniformed, are the most visible and identifiable representatives of “the State”.

I recall a teenager being released from the prison where I then worked. His adoring parents waited for him in the car park...with a white stretch limo they’d hired for the day, champagne, balloons, the lot. They planned to do a sort of victory parade around the town with him. Not sure that’s how the girl he’d raped would see it, or her family.

What lesson did his parents think they were teaching him? And what’s the betting that all attempts made by prison staff to get him to face up to the consequences of his behaviour were instantly nullified?

Yep, children have no authority figures and role models and don’t learn respect. Parents are wet lettuces who try to be friends with their children, abandoning parenting.
You hit the nail on the head.
 

1eyedcoot

Well-known member
Parents always defending their kids, even when they've been little shits and them knowing that there is no punishment of any type, no telling off and that "they know their rights" is why we've got the problem we have now.

Even adults now - they make a mistake on the road, and it's not their fault, it's yours for having the audacity to be on the road at the same time as them. As a PP said, it's always someone elses fault.

The lessons about taking responsibility for your actions / accountability has vanished at some point and needs to be reinstalled quickly.

Even at work, we had a policy if you break something you let someone know so it can be replaced/checked, do they do that? No. It's left for someone else to take the blame when they have to report it. <bitter>
 

horsesgallore

Well-known member
When I was a kid, if you got into trouble in school, that was nothing compared to what happened at home! If a cop caught you doing something, they would literally give you a clip round the ear and when that was learned about at home... Neighbours told kids off and because we had been brought up to respect other people, particularly adults, you did what you were told. Of course kids weren't perfect then, but we were a hell of a lot better behaved than the little brats are now.

Me and my daughter were at a friend's house for lunch before all going on to a hen party. Daughter was 22 at the time. Friend's daughter of the same age, came down wearing something not really suitable and had a strop before going and changing. As we drove to the party, my daughter said to me 'If I'd spoken to you like that, my ears would still be ringing.' She was right, they would indeed have still been ringing. I love my friend dearly and when the kids were little, they were told off by whoever was closest if required, but her daughter is an only and very spoiled. She has grown up. Leaving home was a reality check of the best kind.
 

IdleWorm

Well-known member
Daughter was 22 at the time. Friend's daughter of the same age, came down wearing something not really suitable and had a strop before going and changing.
At 22?! Who decided it wasn’t suitable?! I agree with most of this thread, but you can’t tell a grown woman what she can and can’t wear, this isn’t Saudi Arabia! 😳
 

MishMash

Well-known member
It’s because we’ve raised ungrateful, spoiled, entitled little shits who are now adults.

One glance at MN will show you that we are all raising little centres of the universe, with no values and moral compass passed down by generations.

Threads upon threads about hating or disrespecting in-laws, arguing about why their child should give up their seat on public transport, abusing teachers who try to educate and instill some discipline in their little brats...
Totally agree.

All these excuses that trotted out time after time, trying to justify why a 10 year old who uses a scooter and a bike but can’t possibly stand for five minutes on a bus. I reckon there is also a sense of “my kids are more important than anyone else” in there too.

When I was young, if an adult saw you doing something wrong, Like cycling on the pavement, they told you off. On MN you get sob stories about how you have damaged their precious psyches and that it is too dangerous to cycle on the roads.

Years ago, I walked past a parked car, just as a child of about 10 threw a balled up tissue out of the window. I was so annoyed at the sheer disregard for anything other than herself that I picked up the tissue and chucked it back inside, telling her not to be so disgusting. With any luck she is now too scared to be a litterbug.
 

horsesgallore

Well-known member
At 22?! Who decided it wasn’t suitable?! I agree with most of this thread, but you can’t tell a grown woman what she can and can’t wear, this isn’t Saudi Arabia! 😳
It was a dressy tea party type thing and she was wearing ripped jeans and a crop top or something similar. The invitation had specified that it was a tea party and the bride wanted more formal dress. Friend's daughter stropped when she realised that she wasn't wearing the same sort of things we were and spoke to her mother in a way I wouldn't have tolerated. Its not Saudi, but she knew better.
 

Otters Rule

Well-known member
At 22?! Who decided it wasn’t suitable?! I agree with most of this thread, but you can’t tell a grown woman what she can and can’t wear, this isn’t Saudi Arabia! 😳
I think sometimes you can if they are likely to insult the hosts or others attending, or it would be plain embarrassing. There's a time and a place... I'm a bit old fashioned and I think it falls under the heading of our responsibility to others and being mindful of their feelings.
 

IdleWorm

Well-known member
I think sometimes you can if they are likely to insult the hosts or others attending, or it would be plain embarrassing. There's a time and a place... I'm a bit old fashioned and I think it falls under the heading of our responsibility to others and being mindful of their feelings.
Yes fair enough, I agree with that. It sounded as though the woman was getting told off because her skirt was too short!
 

Eliza

Well-known member
I think there's a general erosion of standards too. Which also encompasses a lack of respect for anyone else. Like thinking there's nothing wrong with wearing pyjamas to the supermarket or not being able to use a knife and fork properly etc.

I remember a thread on MN where the knife and fork issue was brought up and people were arguing til they were probably blue in the face that its their right not to use knives and forks and to let their kids eat how they like. It is, but don't complain when your kids are considered feral and never invited anywhere. And of course the 'what about disabilities' was trotted out, but 9.5 out of 10 of these kids were just badly behaved shits with no manners or discipline.
 

Reinette Pompador

Well-known member
I think a lot of what we see is now spread across social media so is more in full view. I'm ex-emergency services (police in the 80's and 90's) and I was involved in many significant attacks that were barely mentioned by news outlets. One where me and a colleague were trapped inside a house where we had been lured to and then fire bombed all the exits once we were inside looking for a terrified young girl that didn't exist. We were stuck inside while the mob of teenagers outside sang and chanted about us burning and dying. It barely made the 19th page of the local paper and wasn't reported on the national news at all.
Ambulances were robbed quite often, maybe 3 or 4 times a month on my patch, for the drugs they carried but they had less equipment back then so less reason to rob them. The fire service always had teenagers calling them out for fake fires and arson on a daily basis, it was so common that on occasion they didn't turn up because they thought it would be fake but sadly peoples lives were lost and houses destroyed.

It just wasn't reported as widely as it is now. Someone used to have to telephone the local paper or news station to report incidents. Very few people bothered. News travels very fast now, often before someone has even reported it to the police it will be on social media with a guilty verdict handed out by the local community and it will be picked up by numerous news outlets without anyone contacting them.

I think its always been there to some degree, but historically dealt with in a different manner and without the high speed grape-vine we have today to spread the news.
 

Otters Rule

Well-known member
I think news being 'instant' and access to all information being pretty much instant has reset our brains. We expect answers and responses to be instant.

Also responsible for the instant celebrity phenomenon. People famous for being famous - and not because they've achieved something or deserved the celebrity status. (If I could pout and wiggle my arse I could be famous too. 😆)


I think the internet is to blame for the 'I want it now' society we inhabit and attitudes we see exhibited daily.

The threat of posting videos of anti-social actions on the web seems to be of limited use. The bloody idiots don't care. It's just another type of celebrity to them, they're that thick.
 
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