Characters in books/films you think might be autistic?

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I was thinking about the books I've read and wondering if some of the characters in them would meet the criteria for possible ASD in today's real life.

Some examples: Mary Lennox from The Secret Garden. Massive meltdowns in early childhood when things aren't exactly as they normally are, doesn't socialise easily with other children in groups, only learnt to read because she wanted to and not because others wanted her to, never saw the point in dolls, obsessed by finding answers to mysterious questions/occurrences and not easily distracted from her quest. Her cousin Colin Craven may also meet some criteria although his problems would likely be categorised as anxiety and depression today.

Eustace 'and he almost deserved it' Scrubb from the last three books of the Narnia Chronicles. He is socially challenged and emotionally undeveloped at first, and can't grasp the concept of other worlds; not won't, can't - until he's thrown head first into one. His knowledge is trainspotterish, all lists and catalogues and obscure words, and he has a tendency to trust official authorities and 'science' without question. Until, of course, he ends up in the Narnian universe...

Then there's Spock the Vulcan, and Data the android, from Star Trek, whose characters both explore similar themes around social understanding and emotional awareness, mainly in the films. They have always been my favourite Trekkie characters.

Anyone else you can think of?
 
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I always saw Mary Lennox’s attitude and behaviour as a reaction to the trauma she experienced in the cholera epidemic and her rather remote upbringing before that, but the autism theory is fascinating.
 
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Then there's Spock the Vulcan, and Data the android, from Star Trek, whose characters both explore similar themes around social understanding and emotional awareness, mainly in the films. They have always been my favourite Trekkie characters.

I don't know much about autism, but I do like a good Start Trek chat (as evident by avatar and name).

I've always liked that in each of the 'new' ST series there is usually at least one non-human (or even non-humanoid) character whose story arc is to explore humanity:
TNG - Data
DS9 - Odo
VOY - The Doctor, and to some degree Seven

Haters might say it's a trope and a plot prop, but I don't care, I love it! ?
 
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Eleonor Oliphant I think could be on the autistic spectrum.

I heard an interview with the author where she refused to put Eleanor in a 'category', but I have to say that until I heard that I had presumed the same, so many of her ways of thinking and behaving seemed to fit. Awesome book.
 
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Eleanor definitely had autistic tendencies. Not Spock though. That was the whole point of the Vulcan culture, it wasn’t that they didn’t feel emotions, they were just so in control that emotions were irrelevant. That’s not autism.
 
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Newt from Fantastic Beasts.

I think the actor (Eddie Redmayne) suggested the character is on the spectrum in an interview. He's very passionate about what he does and knows, and is very smart, socially awkward.
 
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Eleonor Oliphant I think could be on the autistic spectrum.

I was going to say Eleanor Oliphant but then I wondered if her traits weren't due to having an abusive mother and her memory blocking out the trauma of losing her younger sister in the fire.
 
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Not Spock though.
I read some article that described Spock's character as 'an early exploration of autism'. I'm not sure I agree either, if I'm honest. Vulcan values (the primacy of reason and rationality and the necessity for absolute emotional control) ring bells with me that come from somewhere around ancient Greek philosophies, developed in the 18th century, but I'd have to read a bit more about it to know what I'm talking about.

Data on the other hand, and Seven of Nine, are much more on the money in terms of autistic traits.
 
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Data is a machine, so couldn't be autistic. He might have some autistic traits, but since he has no emotions until much, much later, he couldn't be autistic. After that, his emotions are that of a toddler, who is still learning about them and has no real control over them.
 
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I read some article that described Spock's character as 'an early exploration of autism'. I'm not sure I agree either, if I'm honest. Vulcan values (the primacy of reason and rationality and the necessity for absolute emotional control) ring bells with me that come from somewhere around ancient Greek philosophies, developed in the 18th century, but I'd have to read a bit more about it to know what I'm talking about.

Data on the other hand, and Seven of Nine, are much more on the money in terms of autistic traits.
Stoicism?
 
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My nomination is Scarlett O'Hara.

She doesn't understand other people or their feelings at all. She can only stand a conversation if she is the main topic, why Ashley wants Melanie instead of her is an utter mystery to her. Melanie isn't pretty! She doesn't tell Ashley how wonderful he is! (Scarlett has a rigid script for attracting men which, to be fair, usually works).

She is described as [something like] "to the end of her days she could never understand a complexity" (ie complex personality). At the end of the book she muses that if she had ever understood Ashley she would never have loved him, and if she had ever understood Rhett she would never had loved him.

She is also very good at Maths!

One of my favourite bits of writing in the book is when she confides in Grandma Fontaine. Grandma tells her of a traumatic experience that happened to her, in an attempt to help her through her problems. It's really awful and heart rending. But Scarlett's reaction is just irritation and boredom. She can't empathise at all.

She is a fantastically written character, in my view.

Aargh that should read "if she had ever understood Rhett she never would have LOST him."
 
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Bar Newt Schamander and Sheldon I haven't read any of these books/seen these shows.

To be honest, to some degree I think Autism is being used as another term for just being socially awkward the two are totally different.

So based on that, Newt Schamander, No.

Sheldon, potentially based on being unable to deviate from the norm.
 
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I don't know much about autism, but I do like a good Start Trek chat (as evident by avatar and name).

I've always liked that in each of the 'new' ST series there is usually at least one non-human (or even non-humanoid) character whose story arc is to explore humanity:
TNG - Data
DS9 - Odo
VOY - The Doctor, and to some degree Seven

Haters might say it's a trope and a plot prop, but I don't care, I love it! ?

Live long and proper fellow Trekkie ?
 
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Uncle Quentin for sure, not so sure about George though.
I think George was because Uncle Quentin was basically my Father in man level autism and I was very much a George level tomboy and late life female diagnosed as Aspergers. So I am sticking with it as someone who 'knew' George's vibe as a young 'un.
 
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