Going to the beach

RomaniEuntDomus

Well-known member
But there has been a change, that’s undeniable. When I first started flying, people were properly dressed. I can guarantee on my flight next week there will be flip flops, women wearing bandeau type strapless dresses, men in sleeveless vests. On a flight last year I stood behind a girl (a mother actually, carrying her baby) wearing a T shirt mini dress with literally nothing underneath it.

I don’t think it’s snobbish not to want to be rubbing arms with someone else’s naked flesh.
Well, in many all inclusive hotels there's a dress code with no bare chests/vests and no swimsuits for dinner. Maybe a rule like this would work on flights?

When flights were more expensive the flight was a special occasion in itself, with behaviour codes to match.
 

SuzieDoYouCopy?

Well-known member
As much as I agree with this post, and I do, wholeheartedly, this is another subject that will decend into another argument. I'm going to sound like my grandmother now;
I've said it before and I'll say it again, standards have fallen.
It's not so much what they wear, it's the apparent lack of self respect and self worth that comes across with behaviour already outlined and what is worn.

<braces self>
Ha ha! Cross post you fellow old gimmer! 😂
 

MistressOfRestraint

Well-known member
My worst flight was in February when we were repatriated on a “wet flight” from a Caribbean island at the beginning of Coronavirus. I had forgotten how bad airline food used to be - the likes of Flybe and EasyJet have really upped their game.
 

MistressOfRestraint

Well-known member
As much as I agree with this post, and I do, wholeheartedly, this is another subject that will decend into another argument. I'm going to sound like my grandmother now;
I've said it before and I'll say it again, standards have fallen.
It's not so much what they wear, it's the apparent lack of self respect and self worth that comes across with behaviour already outlined and what is worn.

<braces self>
That‘s exactly what I mean. It’s indicative of a decline in public behaviour, and a rise in self entitlement. Everyone thinks their needs are paramount.
 

LadyMuck

Well-known member
That‘s exactly what I mean. It’s indicative of a decline in public behaviour, and a rise in self entitlement. Everyone thinks their needs are paramount.
Who gets to be the judge of behaviour? You, presumably. Your need to not be surrounded by flip flops and vest tops.
 

Hotsoapywater

Well-known member
As much as I agree with this post, and I do, wholeheartedly, this is another subject that will decend into another argument. I'm going to sound like my grandmother now;
I've said it before and I'll say it again, standards have fallen.
It's not so much what they wear, it's the apparent lack of self respect and self worth that comes across with behaviour already outlined and what is worn.

<braces self>
I'll not fall out with you on that one, Coot. Stabdards have fallen and I'm beginning to sound like my mother, who was always immaculate and groomed. I see men walking round town without shirts on, un supermarkets, leaning over the fruit with sweat dripping from their armpits. In the hospitality industry, sleeveless tops aren't allowed for this very reason back home. Women walking in heels that they can't walk in and wearing the most minimal of clothing with breasts hanging out..Fine if at the beach and only then.
 

LadyMuck

Well-known member
I’m happy to elaborate, since it’s my post you’ve taken exception to. I don’t care what people wear on the beach, or lounging around in their own homes. It’s entirely their choice. I do care what I have to sit next to in close proximity.
How kind of you to allow people to wear what they want on the beach.

Unless the airline or establishment has set rules for dress, it is their choice what they wear full stop.
 

1eyedcoot

Well-known member
I'll not fall out with you on that one, Coot. Stabdards have fallen and I'm beginning to sound like my mother, who was always immaculate and groomed. I see men walking round town without shirts on, un supermarkets, leaning over the fruit with sweat dripping from their armpits. In the hospitality industry, sleeveless tops aren't allowed for this very reason back home. Women walking in heels that they can't walk in and wearing the most minimal of clothing with breasts hanging out..Fine if at the beach and only then.
Thank you. I'm a little relieved to hear I'm not the only one who thinks this.
 

dingdong

Well-known member
Who gets to be the judge of behaviour? You, presumably. Your need to not be surrounded by flip flops and vest tops.
I am not young and from a different culture but in the 80s and 90s when my parents flew a lot they always looked like they were going to church or a party when they went to the airport. Still makes me chuckle when I remember the effort they put in. They have chosen comfort now thank goodness.
I have no problem with flip flops but vest on a hot sweaty day, no. I shared a taxi with a college student to save money to go to the airport an hour away and he stank like, seriously, I grew up with open sewers and horrible toilets in a third world country but he literally made me gag and almost threw up because of his BO.
 

Gin&ASplashOfTonic

Well-known member
I'll not fall out with you on that one, Coot. Stabdards have fallen and I'm beginning to sound like my mother, who was always immaculate and groomed. I see men walking round town without shirts on, un supermarkets, leaning over the fruit with sweat dripping from their armpits. In the hospitality industry, sleeveless tops aren't allowed for this very reason back home. Women walking in heels that they can't walk in and wearing the most minimal of clothing with breasts hanging out..Fine if at the beach and only then.
See, I'm relaxed when it comes to clothes (I do the school run in bondage trousers and have spent a good portion of my life being looked at like a specimen by Grannies in Tesco), however nobody can argue that this 'in supermarkets, leaning over the fruit with sweat dripping from their armpits.' is not disgusting. I don't believe anybody who says they think this is ok.
 

FurloughednFucked

Well-known member
I too can see why the initial statement by @Raffles may have caused some upset. I'm on a low income and it does come across, as do some of the following posts, as a bit like if the likes of me couldn't afford to fly, there wouldn't be a problem.
And I do disagree with that sentiment because the contents of my, or anyone elses bank account, does not directly correlate towards their morals or behaviour. Either with or without alcohol.

I haven't flown for a few years now, but I have seen a decline in behaviour in general and in the attitude and entitlement towards alcohol. And that's across the board.
I've had responses from offering me money, threatening violence, actual violence, asking me who do I think I am, telling me I'm a jumped up little power hungry thicko..... All for refusing service of alcohol to people that are already drunk.
The problem with alcohol is it affects everyone differently, amounts, types and personal differences such as have they eaten that day make a world of difference in how someone reacts to drinking. Some of the amounts people have stated here would sit me on my backside, for others it would barely touch them.
And you've got people who have never clapped eyes on you before responsible for that, not the person actually requesting and drinking it. I personally, couldn't care a less if you want to drink yourself into a stupor. But when the law makes me responsible for that, and I stand to be punished, then I'm going to do something about it. And I don't care about the contents of your bank account at that point.

My personal view is that alcohol should not be served at airports or on planes, and anyone that is drunk is refused to fly. Everyone, every airline and no exception. I just think it's not a risk worth taking to be honest, people are notoriously difficult to deal with when they're drunk, why encourage that in an enclosed space a mile in the sky where they can't be removed or separated?

But I honestly don't think "class" has anything to do with it. There's a lax attitude in general towards alcohol and the effects it has with a bit of an eye rolly "what are you like!" Attitude when someone behaves like an idiot through drink, rather than them being held to account and responsible for the fact they're in that state to start with.
 

Fortress24

Well-known member
I’m happy to elaborate, since it’s my post you’ve taken exception to. I don’t care what people wear on the beach, or lounging around in their own homes. It’s entirely their choice. I do care what I have to sit next to in close proximity.
Fully agree with you. Yes I may not be able to do anything about it on a plane where the 'rules' don't exist but it would certainly colour my view of someone.

Luckily it is controlled on holiday as you aren't allowed in restaurants (where I go) unless you adhere to the dress code. And thankfully they are strict about it.
 

1eyedcoot

Well-known member
See, I'm relaxed when it comes to clothes (I do the school run in bondage trousers and have spent a good portion of my life being looked at like a specimen by Grannies in Tesco), however nobody can argue that this 'in supermarkets, leaning over the fruit with sweat dripping from their armpits.' is not disgusting. I don't believe anybody who says they think this is ok.
What are bondage trousers?

If you're wearing them on the school run they're obviously not what is springing to my, admittedly filthy, mind.
 
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