I need a recommendation for book club

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We're a fairly diverse group of school mums, we meet roughly once a month to drink wine discuss literature.

We liked - the handmaid's tale, girl woman other, a little life, the goldfinch, the seven deaths of Evelyn hardcastle, normal people....

We didn't like - the Wych elm, the confession, rivers of London....

Thanks in advance
 
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Murder on Wrotham Hill (Diana Souhami) is a fascinating portrayal of post-war austerity Britain, and it focuses on the murder of Dagmar Petrzywalski and how her killer was caught and ultimately hanged.

Souhami is an excellent writer and the book depicts life in 1946/7 very accurately.





Thrones, Dominations (Jill Paton Walsh) was recommended to me by someone on this site, a few days ago, and it is such a good, readable book.

Detective fiction. This book is set in 1936 and the Abdication Crisis is the backdrop to the story.
 
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The Narrow Road to the Deep North - brilliant book and I don't think that any of the reviews really do it justice. It does appear to resolve around men's world's, but the novel touches so brilliantly on the roots (and failings) of our self-perceptions, the limits of human endurance and behaviour, and the very heart of fascination in love ... Mann Booker winner in 2014.

 
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If you liked the Handmaid’s Tale you might like Vox. It’s of a similar vein (or so I’ve heard, the HT is still in my “to read” pile).
 
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Lovely, thank you all. I haven't heard of most of these, so they are going on my list. They sound good so I might read them anyway. People are always recommending the heart's invisible furies, I will give that a go next (can't wait until next book club!)
If I remember, I will come back and tell you what I thought and what we decide on ??
 
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Yes, really beautifully written.

Circe stayed with me for quite a long time and gives a fresh perspective on Greek Myth.
I read Circe earlier this year, it is amazing! Have you read her other one, Apollo? I heard it wasn't as good, and didn't want to spoil Circe
 
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I haven’t read Apollo. I did try A Song for Achilles but struggled to really get into it. Think I just loved the voice and female perspective of Circe more.
 
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That's what I've heard. I think I'll leave - plenty of other wonderful books to explore above!
 
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Capital by John Lanchester - works on many levels, and makes you think about the type of capital we actually have, and the capital that we value.

The White Crocodile by KT Medina - I finished this in a day. I've never looked at NGOs in quite the same way. It's a sort of murder mystery wrapped up with mine clearance and the breakdown of a marriage.

The Reluctant Fundamentalist by Moshin Hamid - I chose it for the bookgroup I used to run, and one lady turned up with two sheets of A4 of discussion points after she'd read it.
 
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Second, The Heart's Invisible Furies, as well as, A Ladder to the Sky-also by John Boyne.

Where the Cawdads Sing is good for reading groups too.
 
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I came on to recommend Crawdads, but was beaten to it. Beautiful readable escapism. Perfect for now, if a little forgettable.

Also noticed the recommendation for The Narrow Road to the Deep North. This is genuinely one of the most amazing books I have ever read. I don't think a book has ever affected me so much. Some parts are truly harrowing, but there is also so much beauty and honesty. I agree it hasn't had the long term success it deserves.

Have to say I don't really understand the fuss about Hearts Invisible Furies. It's good, but (to me) overhyped.

The Reluctant Fundamentalist (also recommended upthread) is a good book club book. Really made me think and can lead to loads of wider discussion.

Depends what you want from your book club really!
 
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Good question @Mary the most successful ones have been where we talk about the book a lot, not just agree it was good and go straight for the wine. Some of us don't like harrowing (I don't mind it) and it does make for good discussion.
We also like ones where there are adaptations so we can have a night out too!
 
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@MrsMaui in that case The Reluctant Fundamentalist would be great from that list. It's an easy book to read (in terms of writing style), not too long and is thought provoking.

Another option, is Invisible Women if you don't mind non-fiction. It is a bit longer though, so you might want to check out the length / focus on a couple of chapters.

I would obviously recommend The Road to the Deep North as a personal read though if you don't mind a sometimes difficult read.
 
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Thanks @Mary
I'm actually halfway through invisible women, and it's great but not an easy read (and it's taking me ages!)
 
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