Mental Health Books

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If you’ve read any books on this subject, what were your favourites and why?

My favourite book in this genre is:
Love’s Executioner, and other tales of psychotherapy’ by Irving Yalom.

I love this book because it’s such a fab read. It’s not dry at all, very engaging, and reads almost like a novel rather than factual stuff. Text booky stuff can get a bit yawnsome.

What other good ones have you read?
 
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I am currently plodding Aspergers Syndrome a guide for professionals and parents by Tony Attwood.

It makes interesting reading but only because my 13 year old daughter has just had a diagnosis.

Not going to lie. It wouldn't even be on my radar pre diagnosis.
 
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No, I’m not going to lie either, that wouldn’t make my reading list!

Too professional I suppose. Which is exactly why you are interested but from an enjoyable read perspective it sounds a bit heavy.

I hope you find it helpful though.
 
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One I have always remembered reading is 'The Examined Life' by Stephen Groez.

Not mental health directly, but it examines why humans think in certain ways. Quite mind-blowing.
Yes I agree, that was a good one. That’s the kind of thing I’m looking for really. Not too text- booky but not written by a celeb who knows very little but is jumping on the MH bandwagon.

Fearn cotton springs to mind as an example of the above.
 
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I did read:
Why do women write more letters than they post by Darian Leader many years ago.

I had gone through a life changing break up and wanted to make sense of where I had gone wrong. I hadn't, he was in the wrong for putting it about with another woman ?

On the back of that book, I wrote myself a letter with a 'do not open for a year'.
It was a revelation when I opened it. I hadn't realised at the time how low and maudlin I really was.
 
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I did read:
Why do women write more letters than they post by Darian Leader many years ago.

I had gone through a life changing break up and wanted to make sense of where I had gone wrong. I hadn't, he was in the wrong for putting it about with another woman ?

On the back of that book, I wrote myself a letter with a 'do not open for a year'.
It was a revelation when I opened it. I hadn't realised at the time how low and maudlin I really was.
I once read (can't recall but it was in German) a counsellor as part of therapeutic treatment, asked their client to write a letter to themselves in their dominant hand and answer the letter in their non dominant hand. Really interesting pathway. Your post reminded me of this, quirky.

I'll try to find it.
 
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I did read:
Why do women write more letters than they post by Darian Leader many years ago.

I had gone through a life changing break up and wanted to make sense of where I had gone wrong. I hadn't, he was in the wrong for putting it about with another woman ?

On the back of that book, I wrote myself a letter with a 'do not open for a year'.
It was a revelation when I opened it. I hadn't realised at the time how low and maudlin I really was.

Whilst in a bad relationship I wrote journals. It’s actually quite pain to read back, I can’t believe what I put myself through
 
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Thanks @NotSorry, that sounds the kind of thing, I’ll have a look. Totally forgot about Tanya Byron and I haven’t really read any of her stuff for a general audience, it sounds good!
 
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The book you wish your parents had read by Phillipa Perry is very good.

I'm just starting The body keeps the score after a lot of people have recommended it to me.
 
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I'm just starting The body keeps the score after a lot of people have recommended it to me.
That is a good read too. In a similar vein, In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter A.Levine is worth reading. His work on trauma and the body is very helpful.
 
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The book you wish your parents had read by Phillipa Perry is very good.

I'm just starting The body keeps the score after a lot of people have recommended it to me.
Van der Kolk’s book on trauma is a classic, I’ve read it but not for ages. And it would probably be really useful at the moment given what’s going on for people so thank you @noodl for reminding me of it.
That is a good read too. In a similar vein, In an Unspoken Voice: How the Body Releases Trauma and Restores Goodness by Peter A.Levine is worth reading. His work on trauma and the body is very helpful.
I still haven’t read Levine’s book! ? I’m going to order it.

These are very therapist-y books are either of you therapists @noodl and @ThistledownHair?
 
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These are very therapist-y books are either of you therapists @noodl and @ThistledownHair?
I’m not but it could have been an alternative future if I hadn’t picked my other favourite subject to study at degree level. I’ve always been interested in different modalities for understanding human nature. My own psyche responds well to more Jungian and Transpersonal explorations. I’ve always found wisdom in stories.
 
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I’m not but it could have been an alternative future if I hadn’t picked my other favourite subject to study at degree level. I’ve always been interested in different modalities for understanding human nature. My own psyche responds well to more Jungian and Transpersonal explorations. I’ve always found wisdom in stories.

Yes! There really is wisdom in stories. Have you come across narrative therapy? Pretty much encapsulates the wisdom in stories idea, about the stories we create for our own identities and the meanings we ascribe to them. Fascinating.
 
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Yes! There really is wisdom in stories. Have you come across narrative therapy? Pretty much encapsulates the wisdom in stories idea, about the stories we create for our own identities and the meanings we ascribe to them. Fascinating.
That does sound fascinating! Thank you...will look it up.
 
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