The Book Corner

P.D. James. Good murder mysteries that are an uncomplicated good read.
The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson (Men who stare at goats) Jon Ronson is the Louis Theroux of weird and interesting journalistic style books that you can pick up and put down..
My Mum reads PD James with a dictionary on standby. I love her books. The majority were on Kindle at a really good price recently. I have them all in book form, but take the Kindle when I travel.
 

DinosaurChickens

Well-known member
My Mum reads PD James with a dictionary on standby. I love her books. The majority were on Kindle at a really good price recently. I have them all in book form, but take the Kindle when I travel.
YES to the kindle PD James deal, that is precisely how I got my first two last week. I love a good murder/detective story and don't know how I have managed to miss her over the years despite seeing Murder at Pemberley. I like the Vera series by Ann Cleeves as well and had read every Agatha Christie by the age of 15.
P.D James is a great discovery for me.
 

Horses Gallore

Well-known member
The only physical book I currently have on the go is a non-fiction one about the Beaufort family, explaining how the family came to such prominence that one of their ilk, Henry VII, came to sit on the throne. In case anyone hasn't guessed, I am not a fan of Henry VII, but the book is interesting. I only tend to read it in bed and the print is absolutely minute...

I am reading a lot on my kindle at work and am reading the Wintercombe series by Pamela Belle, which doesn't require any brain power. Its set around the time of Oliver Cromwell. I am quite into my audio books, which I hadn't really expected and listen whilst walking to and from the car and work. I had downloaded the new Ken Follet, because I do like his books, but the narrator was so appalling that I have returned it and got the second Harry Potter book, narrated by Stephen Fry. I often listen while I'm stitching, too. I have the Harry Potter books on my kindle and I am eyeing up the set of actual books at the moment. I really enjoy them and they bring back warm memories of me reading them aloud to the children when they were younger. They are also the first set of books that daughter no 2 read on her own. She has severe dyslexia, and I was so pleased that she began reading for pleasure. Something else to thank JKRowling for.
 

Givingitlarge

Well-known member
I've thought off a slightly off the wall one. The Beetle by Richard Marsh. Penguin reprinted it recently, I think it's from the 1890s but it's a sort of easy to read light horror thing. if you like Dracula, for example, it's worth a go. It's a bit schlocky in the same way, I think it was published at much the same time and actually outsold the Bram Stoker.
 

Otters

Well-known member
Just finished reading the psychological thriller Strangers by C L Taylor. It really was hard to put the book down and get on with stuff that needed doing. My favourite type of read.

"Three strangers. Three secrets. And one big lie.

First there’s Ursula. Unable to face up to the tragedy that consumes her, her world has shrunk to an almost unrecognisable state. But a string of missing people – and her housemate’s permanently locked basement door – set off a chain of events that she soon has no control over.

Then Alice, who’s in the first flush of her relationship with Simon, a man she met by chance, and who seems perfectly normal – except that he flinches at the slightest touch.

And Gareth, who lives a humdrum life as he struggles to cope with his mum’s increasing dementia. She can’t remember much about her days – not even when a postcard from his long-dead father comes through the door.

None of these three strangers have ever met, but their worlds will soon collide in the most dramatic way possible, as the lie that has been told is finally answered for...."

The master of suspense is back! Prepare yourself for the latest nail-shredding, heart-in-mouth roller coaster ride from the Sunday Times best seller."
 

TattieScone

Well-known member
Thanks everyone for all the suggestions so far.

I rather enjoy a good murder mystery and a historical tale so there's a good selection of titles and new author names that I'll have to keep a look out for at the library.

That Beetle one sounds interesting @Givingitlarge but it may be too scary for me as I am such a big wuss (see earlier post) 😆
 
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lifestooshort123

Well-known member
YES to the kindle PD James deal, that is precisely how I got my first two last week. I love a good murder/detective story and don't know how I have managed to miss her over the years despite seeing Murder at Pemberley. I like the Vera series by Ann Cleeves as well and had read every Agatha Christie by the age of 15.
P.D James is a great discovery for me.
I prefer the Karen Pirie series from McDermid - I'm unreasonably put off once a TV series is made for some reason (perhaps because my imagination has created different characters?). I also loved Agatha Christie and the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes (how scary was the Engineer's Thumb and the Speckled Band). I'd be totally and utterly bereft without books.
 
For those who only know Cynthia Harrod Eagle for her Morland Dynasty, you might not know about her Bill Slider series, which are just brilliant. They are about a Police inspector called Bill Slider based at Shepherd's Bush nick, and are sad, hilarious and moving all at the same time. I have all of them, and they are the only book, outside cookbooks, that I will buy in hardback.

They are on Kindle.
 

lifestooshort123

Well-known member
For those who only know Cynthia Harrod Eagle for her Morland Dynasty, you might not know about her Bill Slider series, which are just brilliant. They are about a Police inspector called Bill Slider based at Shepherd's Bush nick, and are sad, hilarious and moving all at the same time. I have all of them, and they are the only book, outside cookbooks, that I will buy in hardback.

They are on Kindle.
Now that sounds interesting!
 
The only physical book I currently have on the go is a non-fiction one about the Beaufort family, explaining how the family came to such prominence that one of their ilk, Henry VII, came to sit on the throne. In case anyone hasn't guessed, I am not a fan of Henry VII, but the book is interesting. I only tend to read it in bed and the print is absolutely minute...

I am reading a lot on my kindle at work and am reading the Wintercombe series by Pamela Belle, which doesn't require any brain power. Its set around the time of Oliver Cromwell. I am quite into my audio books, which I hadn't really expected and listen whilst walking to and from the car and work. I had downloaded the new Ken Follet, because I do like his books, but the narrator was so appalling that I have returned it and got the second Harry Potter book, narrated by Stephen Fry. I often listen while I'm stitching, too. I have the Harry Potter books on my kindle and I am eyeing up the set of actual books at the moment. I really enjoy them and they bring back warm memories of me reading them aloud to the children when they were younger. They are also the first set of books that daughter no 2 read on her own. She has severe dyslexia, and I was so pleased that she began reading for pleasure. Something else to thank JKRowling for.
Have you read Alathea and the two novels preceding that by Pamela Belle; it's the Heron family trilogy. Thye are really good, especially Alathea which is set in Restoration England.
 

Horses Gallore

Well-known member
Have you read Alathea and the two novels preceding that by Pamela Belle; it's the Heron family trilogy. Thye are really good, especially Alathea which is set in Restoration England.
Yes, I have read The Heron family books. It actually has a 4th book, which is set around the time of Richard III, which pleased me a lot. Its kind of a prequel.
 

Givingitlarge

Well-known member
I’ve just been away for a couple days and have devoured ‘where the crawdads sing’ by Delia Owens. It was in a 2 for 8 quid deal in Tesco and I’d heard a few things about it so gave it a go. Was worried it might be a bit chick lit for my tastes but it’s lovely and very moving.
 

Sandra.Bad

Well-known member
Just finished reading the psychological thriller Strangers by C L Taylor. It really was hard to put the book down and get on with stuff that needed doing. My favourite type of read.

"Three strangers. Three secrets. And one big lie.

First there’s Ursula. Unable to face up to the tragedy that consumes her, her world has shrunk to an almost unrecognisable state. But a string of missing people – and her housemate’s permanently locked basement door – set off a chain of events that she soon has no control over.

Then Alice, who’s in the first flush of her relationship with Simon, a man she met by chance, and who seems perfectly normal – except that he flinches at the slightest touch.

And Gareth, who lives a humdrum life as he struggles to cope with his mum’s increasing dementia. She can’t remember much about her days – not even when a postcard from his long-dead father comes through the door.

None of these three strangers have ever met, but their worlds will soon collide in the most dramatic way possible, as the lie that has been told is finally answered for...."

The master of suspense is back! Prepare yourself for the latest nail-shredding, heart-in-mouth roller coaster ride from the Sunday Times best seller."
I like the sound of that. I've read The Accident by the same author, highly recommended.
 

Cinders

Well-known member
Even though my attention span has been crap this year, too much worry and too much being online, I have actually read more books than I have in years - I am on number 56 - I set my reading challenge for 2020 on Good Reads at 30 so I am almost double that. I have read a mixture of books, I always have a fiction and non-fiction on the go. Just finished a house brick of a book called The Age of Decadence (800 plus pages) about the 40 or so years before World War I in UK (very good but too long) and a fiction book called about a group of German women who are forced to be food tasters for Hitler. Based on a true story, they had to eat massive meals and then a few hours later, Hitler would eat the same if they didn’t keel over and die (translated from Italian, story was fascinating but dull read).

So, for light relief I am reading Elton John’s autobiography which is just out in paperback!!
 

Justsayno

Well-known member
I’ve just been away for a couple days and have devoured ‘where the crawdads sing’ by Delia Owens. It was in a 2 for 8 quid deal in Tesco and I’d heard a few things about it so gave it a go. Was worried it might be a bit chick lit for my tastes but it’s lovely and very moving.
I enjoyed that one. I've just finished One by One by Ruth Ware. It was a quick, enthralling page turner. I'm also working my way through Madeleine L'engel's short stories (The Moment of Tenderness). Her writing is amazing and reminds me I don't need to keep reading mediocre books.
 

Blurry

Member
Any recommendations for a scary, ghost style book?

All my kindle ever suggests is psychological thrillers and Im sick to the back teeth of them now!
 

Justsayno

Well-known member
All I can think of is Stephen King. I've read just about everything of his. Most of my other reading is dystopian, general fiction, war times, and a lot of Paris situated stuff.
 

ostinato

Well-known member
Not a fan of horror or ghost stories but I love fantasy especially Stephen Donaldson. But I'm currently reading the Book of English Place Names....favourites so far are Wiveliscombe in Somerset and Affpuddle in Dorset.
 

Littlemessyhouse

Well-known member
Inspired by the (rather UNinspiring) Haunting of Bly Manor, I've started reading The Turn of the Screw. My god, but it's a bugger of a stiff read, I'm not sure if I can get through it without hurling my Kindle out of the window 😤

Any recommendations for more readable, classic scary fiction? I've already read lots of Poe and things like Frankenstein and Dracula.
The Other, by Thomas Tryon made a real impression on me as a kid. It was published in 1971 but set in the 1930s. Not 19th century, though.
 
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